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MAY 11TH 2017

Cooking Up Success in Street Food


BY MARIELA DE LA MORA

street food, Hospitality

An interview with British Street Food Awards Winner Lee DeSanges


There’s something about choosing food with your nose and eyes first. You’re strolling along and catch the scent of eastern spices and a few paces later, freshly fried cinnamon churros. The handwritten chalkboard menu adds to the sense that inside that stand sizzles something unique - an experience to be had. The queue of hungry people adds to the excitement and the sense of community that comes from devouring an exotic fusion dish from a disposable paper serving boat whilst standing shoulder to shoulder with fellow street food goers.

 

Street food appeals to the senses that truly make dining an experience. Nothing is off limits and in fact, the more daring the more we are intrigued.

 

We spoke to Lee DeSanges, founder of Baked in Brick and winner of the 2016 British Street Food Awards for ‘Best Main Course’ and ‘Best of the Best’ overall. Baked in Brick serves up marinated chicken tikka grilled under the bonnet of a 1964 Mini Cooper. “Sounds completely bonkers but the food is delicious and you can’t just ignore us and our food!” Lee says.

 

Lee shares with us what makes a great street food experience.

 

Lee: Street food is currently the go-to eating experience, bringing normal people’s home cooking to customers. The rise of street food is mostly due to customers wanting fresh tasty food at an affordable price and knowing that their money is going into the pockets of independent traders.

 

Given that the concept for Baked in Brick is so unique, do you feel street food industry is becoming more experiential? Surely the food is key, but in your opinion, what make a great street food experience?

 

Lee: A great street food dish is something you don’t get every day, and it is inspired by something unique to the individual who creates it. It needs to be big and bold. The flavours need to ‘punch you in the face’ and tantalize your taste buds long after you’ve eaten it, so that you want to shout about it to the people you know.

 

What are some of the craziest street food trends you've seen or been inspired by?

 

Lee: I’ve tried street food all over the world. The craziest may be in India where people were cooking tandoori shark on the side of the street. It was a simple dish with a tamarind and coriander chutney. It’s something that really pushed me to make things as interesting and tasty as possible.